9/11 -- St. Petersburg Times Special Report

Sunday, Sept. 1
  • Florida: Terror's launching pad
  • The 19 plotters and their day of terror
  • Remembering

    Monday, Sept. 2
  • When tragedy meets capitalism
  • '9/11 fatigue' is natural, mental health experts say

    Tuesday, Sept. 3
  • Coping as a kid
  • Eric Deggans: 9/11 documentary asks troubling questions about religion
  • Sept. 11 photograph exhibit opens

    Wednesday, Sept. 4
  • Millions in new funding don't guarantee security
  • Donations to local charities slow in months after attacks
  • Sept. 11 donations swamp charities
  • Bush to visit three attack sites on 9/11

    Thursday, Sept. 5
  • Attack anniversary is living history lesson
  • Trading fallback system improved
  • Future of site still beset by debate

    Friday, Sept. 6
  • Senate approves plan to allow armed pilots
  • Dream job becoming demoralizing
  • New plane doors would withstand gunfire
  • What ever happened to ... Those patriotic paint jobs?
  • The other 911
  • Consolidated for the cause

    Saturday, Sept. 7
  • In chaos, TIA tower controlled 9/11 skies
  • Congress, N.Y. reaffirm solidarity
  • Traveling can be nicer in rougher countries
  • For TIA workers, 'normal' not what it used to be
  • Airlines don't see relief over horizon
  • Terror only one blow to tourism
  • A year later, it's the home fires that burn brightly
  • Flying the flag

    Sunday, Sept. 8
  • 125 Cedar Street
  • The drama in Sarasota
  • Cautious, yes, but still traveling
  • As security increases, fervor fades
  • Rising risks
  • Finding lessons in rubble of tragedy
  • Public loss, private grief
  • Duty calls; he goes; they wait
  • Riled residents show true colors
  • Keeping her distance
  • Which way leads up?
  • For the record
  • 45 Questions
  • A lexicon of terror, post-9/11
  • Before attacks, this was the news
  • Other events on Sept. 11
  • Voice mail delivers, retains final words
  • Keeping us rolling
  • 9.11
  • How we'll view it

    Monday, Sept. 9
  • The residue of terror
  • Patriotism is more than emotion
  • What ever happened to . . .: Our religious fervor?
  • The nightmares return
  • Life has the right-of-way
  • Free to disagree
  • 'Time has not healed the pain'
  • Deputies to step up patrol for anniversary
  • Security upgrade since 9/11 slow, steady
  • Enthusiasm for PHCC's security classes dissipates
  • Teachers untangle Sept. 11 lessons
  • A bumpy year for business
  • The man who would have led Afghanistan
  • People who made the headlines

    Tuesday, Sept. 10
  • Multitude to gather to wave U.S. flags
  • Pictures evoke profound feelings
  • Attacks haven't boosted sales of cell phones
  • Schools discover ways to reflect on attacks
  • Flags still wave, but sales fall from peak
  • Three fathers lost
  • Telemarketers easing up on 9/11
  • Nuclear plant adds security layers to prevent terrorism
  • Cough, stress hinder emergency workers
  • Families of missing sit in limbo
  • Places of importance after the attacks

    Wednesday, Sept. 11
  • Remembrance and renewal
  • Flags Along the Bayshore: Tampa Remembers 9/11
  • Ways of remembering
  • A piece of paper . a blue and white truck
  • Is America ready for another attack?
  • Nation to honor victims in silence
  • Poll: Compassion remains
  • The war so far
  • Terror update
  • Attack on Iraq would test headquarters at MacDill
  • 09-11-01 Perspectives
  • Those who died in the attacks
  • Myriad rescue agencies trust their link won't fail
  • Photo gallery
  • (This Flash gallery requires the free Flash Player 5+.)

    Thursday, Sept. 12
  • Emotional service honors those who died selflessly
  • Elements of pride
  • Echo of 9/11 empties airport
  • A day full of tributes, flags and questions
  • Prayer, fellowship pull many through agonizing anniversary
  • Tributes great and small
  • Children in a changed world pause to reflect
  • Citrus recalls 9/11 with its heart
  • Marking the imponderable
  • Ministers assure that God was there that sorrowful day
  • Chime recalls a nation's losses
  • For law officers, day passes quietly
  • Residents gather to heal, remember
  • In big and small ways, our community pays tribute
  • Cities somberly mark Sept. 11
  • Patriotic display greets drivers
  • Day of grief, resolve
  • At county schools, remembrance resounds
  • Travel lags on attacks' anniversary
  • They were us
  • Americans worldwide cautious on anniversary
  • Radical Muslims discuss 'positive outcomes' of Sept. 11
  • Amid grief, Bush gives warning

  • printer version

    People who made the headlines

    Some names that became well known after Sept. 11:

    By Times wires and staff reports
    © St. Petersburg Times
    published September 9, 2002


    Mohamed Atta -- The intensely disciplined, brooding Islamic fundamentalist was apparently the ringleader of the hijackers. Atta, 33, was at the controls of the first plane that crashed into the World Trade Center.

    Mark Bingham -- A 6-foot-5 rugby player and public relations executive, Bingham called his mother from Flight 93 and said he and other passengers were planning to fight back. The plane crashed in Pennsylvania. Bingham, 31 and gay, became a symbol of inspiration to the nation's gay community.

    Rev. Mychal Judge -- A New York fire department chaplain, Judge, 68, succumbed to a heart attack amid the rescue efforts. His death certificate listed him as victim No. 00001 -- the first official fatality of the World Trade Center attack.

    Genelle Guzman-McMillan -- Entombed in the rubble of north tower of World Trade Center for 27 hours, she was the last person to be found alive. An immigrant from Trinidad who lives in Brooklyn, Guzman-McMillan, 31, has recovered from her injuries and married her longtime boyfriend in a wedding arranged by Bride's magazine and CBS' The Early Show.

    Rudolph Giuliani -- His masterful leadership after the attacks transformed him from a lame-duck mayor in messy divorce proceedings to a dynamic leader who personified New York City's remarkable resilience. Giuliani, 58, became Time magazine's Person of the Year.

    Tom Ridge -- In late September, the president named the broad-shouldered governor of Pennsylvania as his chief White House adviser on "homeland security." Now Ridge, 57, is Bush's point person in an effort to win congressional approval for a new Cabinet-level Department of Homeland Security.

    Pervez Musharraf -- Once shunned by the West as a dictator, the Pakistani general-turned-president became America's most important Muslim ally. Musharraf, 59, allowed U.S. forces to use Pakistani military bases and airspace to attack Afghanistan. That enraged Muslim militants, and the country now seethes with internal conflict.

    Daniel Pearl -- The Wall Street Journal reporter, 38, was kidnapped and brutally murdered in Pakistan in late January by Islamic militants protesting Pakistan's alliance with the United States. In July, one man was sentenced to death in a Pakistani court; three others got life sentences. Other suspects remain at large.

    Tommy Franks -- As chief of the Central Command at MacDill Air Force Base in Tampa, the lanky, low-key general, 57, commands U.S. forces in Afghanistan. At first, there was grumbling in some quarters about Franks' strategy. But in March, President Bush asked him to stay at his post for another year.

    Dr. Durgarao Parimi -- On the day of the attacks, the Hernando County physician told other doctors America got what it deserved. Amid the outcry that followed, the Indian-born, Muslim doctor was suspended by Oak Hill Hospital, then reinstated two months later after he apologized. Parimi, 58, an American citizen for 21 years, said he "misstated" his concerns over a breakdown in American security.

    Charles Bishop -- The 15-year-old high school student crashed a stolen Cessna into a Tampa office building on Jan. 5, leaving behind a suicide note in which he claimed allegiance with Osama bin Laden. His family scoffed at suggestions that he was a depressed loner. They sued the maker of the acne drug Accutane, contending that it left him "severely psychotic."

    Robert Stevens -- The tabloid photo editor, 62, died Oct. 5 in Palm Beach County in the nation's first known case of inhalation anthrax disease since 1976. Before the anthrax scare had run its course, four more people died and more than a dozen took ill.

    Steven J. Hatfill -- Publicly, the FBI says that Hatfill, 48, is just one of 30 "people of interest" in last fall's anthrax attacks. But, as Hatfill bitterly complains, authorities seem to be focused on him. The germ warfare specialist says he is a patriotic American and had nothing to do with the attacks.


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    Related coverage
  • The residue of terror
  • Patriotism is more than emotion
  • What ever happened to . . .: Our religious fervor?
  • The nightmares return
  • Life has the right-of-way
  • Free to disagree
  • 'Time has not healed the pain'
  • Deputies to step up patrol for anniversary
  • Security upgrade since 9/11 slow, steady
  • Enthusiasm for PHCC's security classes dissipates
  • Teachers untangle Sept. 11 lessons
  • A bumpy year for business
  • The man who would have led Afghanistan
  • People who made the headlines