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A proud father watches his son

By Associated Press
Published January 21, 2005

Former President George Bush watched Thursday as his first-born son was sworn in at the U.S. Capitol for a second term as president.

Both men teared up at George W. Bush's first inauguration in 2001, after the younger Bush worried aloud about belonging to a family of "weepers" who can't keep their emotions in check.

No tears flowed this time, although President Bush appeared a bit misty-eyed as he waited for the inauguration ceremony to begin. Father and son shook hands before taking their places on the platform on the West Front of the Capitol.

"The pride we feel this week is the same pride every parent feels when they see their son hit a home run or their daughter come home with straight A's," the former president, who lost a bid for re-election in 1992, said Wednesday.

Clinton musings: Garfield, his health

It was a classic Clinton moment in the Capitol Rotunda.

Shortly after the inaugural ceremony, dignitaries scurried past reporters and police posted near the door - except for former President Bill Clinton, who strolled along with Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow of Michigan.

Clinton paused in front of a marble statue of James Garfield, launching into a lecture about the 19th century president's life.

Garfield was one of the greatest Civil War generals, Clinton said, adding that it was a "great tragedy" that his presidency was cut short. Garfield was gunned down a little more than a year after he took office and died about two months later.

Of his own health, Clinton said, "For an old guy, I'm doing all right."

Arrest of man is long time coming

U.S. Capitol Police on Thursday arrested the man who had sneaked into George W. Bush's first inauguration and was photographed shaking the president's hand.

Hours before Bush took the oath of office for a second time, Richard Weaver was taken into custody on the Capitol's West Front on an outstanding warrant, police spokesman Michael Lauer said. The warrant involved the 2001 inauguration, when Weaver was seen in photograph shaking Bush's hand and slipping him a coin and a note, and from President Bill Clinton's swearing-in in 1997, when Weaver pulled a similar stunt.

Schwarzenegger draws a crowd

California Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger made a quick trip to the inauguration, surprising constituents at a breakfast on Thursday.

Guests posed for pictures with him, and members of Congress requested autographs.

"It's always really very exciting celebrating, you know, a new beginning," Schwarzenegger said.

CBS's Rather gets emotional

Dan Rather covered what is likely his last inauguration in a CBS News career that has lasted more than 40 years.

"The Fourth of July is a celebration of America's freedom," Rather said. "Inauguration day is a celebration of America's democracy."

Rather, 73, became emotional, his voice breaking as he listened to a patriotic song. "If you cannot feel it deep in your heart, I don't know what to say about you," he said.

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