tampabay.com

Former City College player dies at 78

By wire services
Published March 24, 2005


Norman Mager, who helped propel an unheralded City College team to the NIT and NCAA basketball championships in 1950, a feat that thrilled New York only to be tarnished by a point-shaving scandal, died last Thursday at a hospital in Boynton Beach. Mager, who lived in Boca Raton and Port Washington, N.Y., was 78.

The cause was complications of cancer, his son, Scott, said.

On March 18, 1950, City College defeated top-ranked Bradley, 69-61, at Madison Square Garden to win the NIT. City then scored a 71-68 victory over Bradley in the NCAA Tournament, becoming the only team to win both tournaments in the same year.

Mager joined the Baltimore Bullets of the NBA after graduating, but his basketball career ended in 1951 after he was arrested, along with six City College teammates, on charges of taking money from gamblers to shave points. The scandal involved more than 30 college players. .

COLLEGES

TITLE IX CHANGES: Advocacy groups and NCAA officials are criticizing new federal guidelines that alllow schools to use an e-mail survey to demonstrate they are fulfilling Title IX. Schools will be considered in compliance with Title IX legislation if survey responses suggest there is insufficient interest among women students to support a particular sport.

NCAA President Myles Brand said the new guidelines "will likely stymie the growth of women's athletics and could reverse the progress made over the last three decades."

Department of Education officials argued that the new guidelines do not represent a policy change.

SOCCER

ASIAN GROUP OKs AUSSIES: Australia took an important step Wednesday in its bid to leave the Oceania soccer federation and join the Asian group.

Asian soccer chiefs unanimously agreed to the move, but Australia still must resign from Oceania, apply to the Asian group and receive approval from the sport's world governing body.

Australia this month said it is looking for wider exposure, tougher competition, higher revenues and a chance at direct World Cup qualification.

SWIMMING

PHELPS FACES SEVEN EVENTS: Olympic star Michael Phelps has entered seven events in the U.S. trials for the world swimming championships. He has the top seed in three events at the trials, including the 400 individual medley. He'll swim that event and the 400 freestyle on the first day of trials.

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ET CETERA

DUKE STAR DIES AT 91: Earle Wentz, a standout in football and baseball at Duke during the 1930s, died Monday at 91. Wentz, born in Danville, Va., finished his college football career in 1934 after twice being an All-Southern Conference selection. He was inducted into the Duke Sports Hall of Fame in 1986.

TENNIS: No. 1 Roger Federer and Wimbledon champion Maria Sharapova each received three honors Tuesday at the ATP-WTA Tour awards ceremony. The event, held on the eve of the Miami Masters event, included 19 awards won by 14 players. Sharapova won Player of the Year honors and lifted Fans' Favorite from a vote by WTAtour.com users. She also earned Most Improved Player of 2004.

CURLING: The United States moved to the top of the standings with a 10-7 victory over Canada and Russia secured an Olympic berth at the World Women's Curling Championship Wednesday. The United States is 9-1 in the nine-day championship.

OLYMPICS: The Italian Senate approved a measure Wednesday to provide $104.4-million to the 2006 Turin Olympics organizing committee.