St. Petersburg Times
Special report
Video report
  • For their own good
    Fifty years ago, they were screwed-up kids sent to the Florida School for Boys to be straightened out. But now they are screwed-up men, scarred by the whippings they endured. Read the story and see a video and portrait gallery.
  • More video reports
Multimedia report
Print Email this storyEmail story Comment Email editor
Fill out this form to email this article to a friend
Your name Your email
Friend's name Friend's email
Your message
 

Court says police t-shirt law unconstitutional

The case stemmed from the conviction of Kimberly Sult, who was charged in 2001 for wearing a sheriff's office T-shirt in a St. Petersburg convenience store.

By CHRIS TISCH
Published June 23, 2005



LARGO - The Florida Supreme Court on Thursday ruled that a law prohibiting civilians from wearing police T-shirts or insignias is unconstitutional.

The 5-2 ruling came in response to the conviction of Kimberly Sult, a Pinellas woman who was charged in 2001 after a deputy saw her wearing a sheriff's office T-shirt in a St. Petersburg convenience store.

The Supreme Court said the misdemeanor law prohibiting the wearing of insignias is overly broad, vague and violates due process. A felony law that prohibits the intentional impersonation of a police officer remains in effect.

See tomorrow's Times or sptimes.com for the full report.

[Last modified June 23, 2005, 17:57:09]


Share your thoughts on this story

[an error occurred while processing this directive]
Subscribe to the Times
Click here for daily delivery
of the St. Petersburg Times.

Email Newsletters

ADVERTISEMENT