St. Petersburg Times
 tampabaycom
tampabay.com

Print storySubscribe to the Times

Deal to erase poor nations' $40-billion debt clears hurdle

The Group of Eight promised the day before to underwrite the plan. The International Monetary Fund executive board and World Bank must sign off.

By Associated Press
Published September 25, 2005

WASHINGTON - A deal to erase billions of dollars of debt for poor countries cleared an important hurdle Saturday, winning the endorsement of the International Monetary Fund's steering committee.

The breakthrough was announced by Gordon Brown, Britain's chancellor of the exchequer, who is the chairman of the IMF's policy-setting panel.

Brown said negotiators had reached agreement on "all elements" of the debt cancellation deal. He said the IMF's 24-member executive board would meet soon to formally approve the deal.

"We worked very hard over the last few days as well as over the last few months to try to bring people to agreement on the proposals," Brown told a news conference late Saturday.

The agreement would forgive an estimated $40-billion worth of debt for at least 18 poor countries - most of them in Africa - owed to the IMF, the World Bank and the African Development Bank.

As many as 20 other countries could be eligible if they meet certain conditions. That would push the total amount of debt cancellation to more than $55-billion. The cost would be spread over decades.

The endorsement by the IMF steering committee came one day after the Group of Eight major industrial powers made firm pledges to underwrite the plan, a commitment intended to overcome the biggest obstacle to approval by the lending institutions.

A general framework for the deal was endorsed by leaders of the world's eight major industrial powers at an economic meeting in July in Scotland. The details of putting the deal in place were left largely to the World Bank and the 184-nation IMF to settle.

The deal still needs to be approved by the World Bank - a major lender to poor countries. The World Bank's and IMF's annual meetings continue today, and U.S. officials are predicting swift approval of the debt cancellation deal.

Treasury Secretary John Snow predicted the executive boards of the IMF and World Bank would formally approve the deal within a week.

"We've seen a real breakthrough on debt cancellation by the IMF," said Max Lawson, policy adviser to the charity Oxfam International. "The stage is now set for the World Bank shareholders to fulfill their part of the bargain."

By canceling their debts, poor countries could use the money for education or drugs to fight HIV/AIDS or malaria, supporters of debt forgiveness say.

"Finance ministers took an important step toward freeing some of the world's poorest people from decades of unfair debt burdens," said Oliver Buston, European director at DATA, a debt-relief group started by Irish rock star Bono.

The World Development Movement, another antipoverty group, called the deal a good first step but was disappointed that the agreement didn't cover more countries.

The World Bank and IMF did not want the debt plan to impair their ability to provide aid and sought assurances the rich nations would put up the money to cover the loan repayments lost when the debts are written off.

Responding to those concerns, finance officials from the Group of Eight countries - the United States, Japan, Germany, France, Britain, Italy, Canada and Russia - pledged on Friday to "cover the full cost to offset dollar for dollar" the loan repayments that would be lost.

Snow said those commitments went far in allaying concerns among some countries that the lending institutions would be financially weakened.

[Last modified September 25, 2005, 02:15:40]


World and national headlines

  • Even if you aren't 65, you should still care about Part D
  • Explosion exchange ends optimism for Mideast peace
  • For those with low incomes, it's time to pick a drug plan
  • Frist faces questions about interactions with trustee
  • Thousands rally against Iraq war
  • At a glance: Drug subsidies
  • Deal to erase poor nations' $40-billion debt clears hurdle
  • AIDS expert: Save lives, circumcise men
  • Long thought dead, suspect turns up alive
  • Contest's aim: Vehicles that drive themselves
  • AIDS' terrible toll weakens militaries in African nations
  • Group sets books free to roam around world

  • Canada report
  • Canadian relief ships sent home

  • Hurricane Rita
  • Plenty of damage, but even more relief
  • South of New Orleans, a new flood
  • Bush tours hubs of recovery work
  • Refineries report minor damage, but some in dark
  • Investigation begins into deadly bus explosion on Texas highway
  • Lake Charles holdouts huddled as storm howled

  • Nation in brief
  • Cheney aneurysm surgery a success

  • World in brief
  • Canadian Auto Workers threaten GM with strike
  • Back to Top

    © 2006 • All Rights Reserved • Tampa Bay Times
    490 First Avenue South • St. Petersburg, FL 33701 • 727-893-8111