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Politics

Report: Terror watch lists snag many who share names

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
Published October 7, 2006


WASHINGTON - Thousands of people have been mistakenly linked to names on terror watch lists when they crossed the border, boarded commercial airliners or were stopped for traffic violations, a government report said Friday.

More than 30,000 airline passengers have asked just one agency, the Transportation Security Administration, to have their names cleared from the lists, according to the Government Accountability Office report.

Hundreds of millions of people each year are screened against the lists by Customs and Border Protection, the State Department and state and local law enforcement agencies. The lists include names of people suspected of terrorism or of possibly having links to terrorist activity.

"Misidentifications can lead to delays, intensive questioning and searches, missed flights or denied entry at the border," the report said. "Whether appropriate relief is being afforded these individuals is still an open question."

When questions arose about tens of thousands of names between December 2003 and January 2006, the names were sent back to the agencies that put them on the lists, the GAO said. Half of those were found to be misidentified, the report found.

In December 2003, disparate agencies with counterterrorism responsibilities consolidated dozens of watch lists of known or suspected terrorists into the new Terrorist Screening Center run by the FBI.

People are considered "misidentified" if they are matched to the database and then, upon further examination, are found not to match. They are usually misidentified because they have the same name as someone in the database.

People are considered "mistakenly listed" if they were put on the list in error or if they should no longer be included on the list because of subsequent events, the report said.

Problems developed with the lists after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001.

The no-fly list given to airlines to make sure terrorists don't board airplanes grew exponentially after the attacks. The list is part of the Terrorist Screening Center database.

Children and well-known Americans like Sen. Edward M. Kennedy, D-Mass., have been stopped at airports because their names were the same as those on the no-fly list.

[Last modified October 7, 2006, 01:32:12]


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