tampabay.com

Tates are home again

The family returned from vacation to the reveal of their new Extreme home.

By KEVIN GRAHAM
Published January 14, 2007


TAMPA - The Tate family's lives changed again Sunday, but this time it was for the better.

The first change was in June when an crashing airplane demolished their modest 1950s vintage home. They had no insurance because of a paperwork glitch during refinancing.

Then came the ABC Extreme Makeover: Home Edition show, which whisked the Tates - Tom and Cynthia and their offspring, Ryan, Tommy and Loren - off for a Costa Rican vacation while swarms of workers and volunteers built them a new home inside a week.

Sunday, the wait ended as a white Hummer limo pulled up at 629 E Davis Blvd., and the family saw the results - a 3,500 square-foot, two-story home with four bedrooms and a guest suite.

"Thank you so much," eldest sibling and Iraq veteran Ryan Tate told work crews as he stood in the street and cried.

Cynthia Tate blew kisses to the construction crews. Her husband jumped up and down with both arms stretched high in the air.

Younger children Tommy and Loren, smiled and waved to the crowds of young friends screaming their names.

"I think we really poured our heart and soul into building this home," said Tim Oak, Florida west coast regional president of Home Building and project manager for the Tates' new house. "I couldn't have asked for it to go better."

Makeover executive producer Denise Cramsey said the Tates were chosen because of the dramatic way their lives changed.

Between 200 and 300 subcontractors and volunteers worked on the house at any given time over the week, swarming over the site wearing blue Extreme Makeover T-shirts and white hardhats.

Sunday, as more than 2,000 onlookers cheered "Welcome home, Tates!"

The family made its way to the front door with show design team leader Ty Pennington at their side.

They were home again.

Kevin Graham can be reached at 813 226-3433 or kgraham@sptimes.com

The home

The home's design is inspired by the Spanish eclectic architecture of early Davis Islands' homes. Dave Davis, the developer of the island in the 1920s, had a vision for a community themed around a Mediterranean motif, as displayed in the original homes remaining on the north and west side of Davis Islands. Stucco, sculpted parapets and rough-sawed wood columns and beams, tile roofing, decorative metal railings, balconies and grills characterize this popular style on the island. The Extreme Makeover: Home Edition house incorporates these elements in addition to providing outdoor living spaces with a generous wrap-around front porch, detached garage with guest suite, arched loggia with a water view, and an intimate courtyard with an inviting plunge pool.

The bedrooms

Tom and Cynthia Tate's bedroom is painted in shades of chocolate. Because the home sits across the street from the airport, height restrictions limited the architectural design. The only room on the second floor is Mr. and Mrs. Tate's bedroom. They have a balcony that gives them a view of ships passing in nearby Seddon Channel.

Ryan's room was designed by Ty Pennington. Because Ryan recently returned home from a tour of duty in Iraq as a Marine, his room is designed with a camouflage color scheme. He has a separate living space that includes a kitchenette. Because he's a Florida Gators fan, designers also painted gators in a military motif in the room.

Tommy's room was designed by Paige Hemmis. She outfitted it with dozens of real skateboards that hang from the ceiling. Tommy told designers that his skateboarding friends often spend the night at his place after hanging out, and Hemmis said she wanted to make sure they had enough room for sleepovers. He has three twin beds in his room. Under each is a locker decorated with his friends' graffiti. The primary colors of his room are silver and black.

Loren's room was described by volunteers who helped paint it as the most colorful. She has one wall that's completely red, and the others are accented with stripes of pink, orange and blue. There's a giant makeup mirror in her room, like the kind a movie star would use. She's a fan of karaoke, so her room has been outfitted with a drop-down projector screen for her to perform.

Other features

Interior furnishings, valued at $90,000, were donated by Conover, North Carolina-based Boyles Distinctive Furniture.

The family's kitchen has been outfitted with stainless steel appliances and black granite countertops.

A food preparation room sits to the side of the kitchen.

Archways are throughout the home, including over some of the windows.

The episode

The Extreme Makeover: Home Edition episode featuring the Tate family is expected to air sometime in late March. For more information on the build or the family, visit www.wciextremehome.com.

The home

The home's design is inspired by the Spanish eclectic architecture of early Davis Islands' homes. Dave Davis, the developer of the island in the 1920s, had a vision for a community themed around a Mediterranean motif, as displayed in the original homes remaining on the north and west side of Davis Islands. Stucco, sculpted parapets and rough-sawed wood columns and beams, tile roofing, decorative metal railings, balconies and grills characterize this popular style on the island. The Extreme Makeover: Home Edition house incorporates these elements in addition to providing outdoor living spaces with a generous wrap-around front porch, detached garage with guest suite, arched loggia with a water view, and an intimate courtyard with an inviting plunge pool.

www.wciextremehome.com

The bedrooms

Tom and Cynthia Tate's bedroom is painted in shades of chocolate. Because the home sits across the street from the airport, height restrictions limited the architectural design. The only room on the second floor is Mr. and Mrs. Tate's bedroom. They have a balcony that gives them a view of ships passing in nearby Seddon Channel.

Ryan room was designed by Ty Pennington. Because he was a Marine who fought in Iraq, Ryan's room is designed with a camouflage color scheme. He has a separate living space that includes a kitchenette. Designers also painted gators that decorate the room to match the military motif.

Tommy's room was designed by Paige Hemmis. She outfitted it with dozens of real skateboards that hang from the ceiling. Tommy told designers that his skateboarding friends often spend the night at his place after hanging out, and Hemmis said she wanted to make sure they had enough roof for sleep overs. He has three twin beds in his room. Under each is a locker that his friends painted graffiti on. The primary colors of his room are silver and black.

Loren's room was described by volunteers who helped paint it as the most colorful. She has one wall that's completely red, and the others are accented with stripes of pink, orange and blue. There's a giant makeup mirror in her room, like the kind a movie star would use. She's a fan of karaoke, so her room has been outfitted with a drop-down projector screen for her to perform.


Conover, North Carolina-based Boyles Distinctive Furniture donated interior furnishings valued at $90,000.

The family's kitchen has been outfitted with stainless steel appliances and black granite counter tops.

A food preparation room sits to the side of the kitchen.

Archways are carved throughout the home, including in some of the windows.

The Extreme Makeover: Home Edition episode featuring the Tate family is expected to air sometime in late March. For more information on the build or the family, visit www.wciextremehome.com.