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Letters to the Editor

By TIMES STAFF
Published March 16, 2007


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Home is needed

Re: Assisted-living facility moves in next door, March 9

It truly amazes me, the ignorance of some people. The Foxes and their neighbors (in a Brandon neighborhood) wanted answers. What is going on next door? All they had to do was ask questions.

I have been in the Bee Home on numerous occasions. The home is impeccably clean, and the two residents are being well cared for. I hope that the people that are complaining the most about the facility never have family members or friends that have multiple sclerosis or muscular dystrophy.

But if they did, I would have to believe they would thank God for people like Marlyn Vistro and Kevin Eastman, who care enough to want to give their residents a family atmosphere to live in.

Are the residents mentally disturbed? Come on, people, educate yourselves!

Should you be vigilant about watching your children in the streets? Absolutely, but not, and I repeat, not because of the Bee Home Assisted Living Facility.

Keith Fox warned his neighbors about the possible dangers. His daughter tripping on needles or some little kid popping a pill and dying in front of his eyes? Come on. There is more of a chance of that happening in our public school system or on any street corner.

What really scares me is the last line in the article: "We want to give the feeling that they are not wanted."

People, let's help each other, not harass each other for doing something good and kind.

Janice Guibert, Brandon

 

Meaning of compassion

As a former director of nursing at a skilled extended care facility, I applaud the utilization of homes in normal neighborhoods for the care of clients. As the population ages and health care costs escalate, there is going to be more need for this type of facility. It is so much more humane.

I would much rather be a neighbor to the Bee Home than to the busybody neighbors. Clients of these facilities are no different from you or me. The Foxes and their neighbors fear the unknown. They are ignorant of what they are fearing.

The headline, "Loathed, and perfectly legal," in my opinion, was not a fair representation. The title itself lends the reader to "loathing" the Bee Home and loathing the concept of freedom. The whole issue here is, do people have the freedom to utilize their home in non-standard ways?

As far as needles are concerned, how about the large number of insulin-dependent diabetics who use needles daily at home? You may even have one for a neighbor. Are you going to require them to ask your permission to live there, because they use needles? How about druggies? How do you know if one of your other neighbors is one?

Just because a person is in a facility does not mean that he or she is mentally unstable. Do you not know that a large percentage of the population living at home is considered mentally ill? Which neighbors of yours are mentally ill but have not asked your permission to live near you? See how silly this is?

I hope County Commissioner Al Higgenbotham tells them to go home and mind their own business. If they were good neighbors, they would be kind to the residents of the Bee Home. They have the perfect opportunity to teach their children the meaning of compassion and love for those who need help.

Pat Tope, BSN, MMin, Ph.D., Brandon

 

'Not criminals'

Handicapped people are not criminals that need to be isolated on an island somewhere away from civilization. I worked as a nurse for four years at a nursing and convalescent center in Tampa. It was one of the most rewarding nursing jobs I have ever done in my life. I can't believe the ignorance of some people.

Jeanette DeMarco, Redington Shores

[Last modified March 15, 2007, 07:28:01]


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