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Digest

Man held family captive for 4 years

By TIMES WIRES
Published May 12, 2007


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CHESTER,  S.C. 

For nearly four years, a South Carolina man held his wife and two sons captive in a house infested with maggots and human waste, authorities said.

The boys slept on a bare mattress as their mother was kept in a drug-induced stupor in a house that was decrepit except for a tidy one-room illegal gambling parlor run by Danny William Dove, police said.

Police found maggots infesting the refrigerator. Human waste and used toilet paper littered the bathroom floor and the house smelled like a dead animal, police said.

The boys, ages 4 and 8, didn't go to school. Police say that they rarely were allowed out of the house and that a videocamera monitored their room. The boys' grandmother says they're hard to understand unless they're cursing.

Dove, 45, plied his wife, Tamara, with prescription painkillers and cocaine and forbade her to go outside, police said. Authorities didn't expect the 37-year-old mother would be lucid enough to be interviewed for weeks.

Dove was charged with distribution of a controlled substance, criminal conspiracy, operating a gambling establishment and child neglect.

WASHINGTON

'Katrina' plummets on baby names list

As baby names go, Katrina isn't in vogue these days. After its peak in the 1980s, the name's association with the catastrophic hurricane has knocked its popularity to the lowest level since the 1950s.

Only about 850 baby girls in the United States were named Katrina last year, according to data released Friday by the Social Security Administration. That was good for 382nd.

Ironically, in Louisiana, the number of babies named Katrina jumped from eight in the 12 months before the storm to 15 in the 12 months after.

Overall, the country's most popular names list hasn't changed much since 2005. Emily and Jacob remain atop the list. Emily has been the top girls' name since 1996; Jacob for boys since 1999.

The top 10:

Boys Girls

1. Jacob Emily

2. Michael Emma

3. Joshua Madison

4. Ethan Isabella

5. Matthew Ava

6. Daniel Abigail

7. Christopher Olivia

8. Andrew Hannah

9. Anthony Sophia

10. William Samantha

WASHINGTON

Bush signs bill to reform Red Cross

President Bush signed a bill into law Friday that overhauls the way the American Red Cross governs itself and streamlines its leadership in an effort to avoid the type of problems that beset its response to Hurricane Katrina.

The charity's 50-member board of governors, widely criticized as unwieldy, will be trimmed to no more than 25 members by 2009 and no more than 20 members by 2012.

The board will focus solely on governance and long-term oversight, not on regular operational decisions. All new members will be elected by the board itself; in the past, eight were appointed by the U.S. president and often had spotty attendance records at board meetings.

SHARONVILLE, OHIO

Midair collision of 2 planes kills 3

Two small planes collided Friday over suburban Cincinnati, raining debris onto roads and back yards and killing three people on board, federal investigators said.

The FAA had no information about the aircrafts' flight plans or why they were so close together.

The planes' pilots were not required to file flight plans and apparently were not in contact with air traffic controllers, the FAA said.

No injuries were reported on the ground. Several roads were closed because of the debris.

BOSTON

Charges are dropped in gadget bomb scare

Prosecutors said they would not pursue charges against two men who planted electronic devices around the city as part of a botched advertising campaign after the pair apologized Friday for causing a bomb scare.

Peter Berdovsky, 27, and Sean Stevens, 28, also performed community service at a rehabilitation center in a deal with prosecutors.

In contrast to their first court appearance in January, when they mugged for the camera and waved to friends in the courtroom, the men offered contrite apologies and said they never expected the stunt to cause any turmoil.

HONOLULU

Don Ho's daughter dies month after him

The late Don Ho's daughter, Dayna Ho-Henry, was found dead Friday, her brother said.

The 51-year-old's death comes less than a week after the Waikiki Beach funeral for her father, who died April 14 of heart failure at age 76.

Ho-Henry was one of the legendary singer's 10 children.

No foul play is suspected, police spokeswoman Michelle Yu said.

"The family is grieving the loss of my sister, and we're just trying to make sense of it, " said Ho-Henry's brother, Dwight Ho.

[Last modified May 12, 2007, 00:28:39]


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