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Captain's Corner

What's hot: The tarpon migration is headed up the coast, and with each passing moon phase, more will arrive in Pinellas County waters. A consistent water temperature of 78 degrees is key to bringing these fish inshore to feed. Once bait becomes abundant on the flats, many smaller schools will travel the same route every morning. And this time is good to find silver kings. Calmer waters at daylight give anglers the opportunity to sight-cast tarpon from a good distance. Pinfish, small crabs and threadfins are best baits.

By JIM HUDDLESTON
Published May 21, 2007


What's hot: The tarpon migration is headed up the coast, and with each passing moon phase, more will arrive in Pinellas County waters. A consistent water temperature of 78 degrees is key to bringing these fish inshore to feed. Once bait becomes abundant on the flats, many smaller schools will travel the same route every morning. And this time is good to find silver kings. Calmer waters at daylight give anglers the opportunity to sight-cast tarpon from a good distance. Pinfish, small crabs and threadfins are best baits.

Tactics: With these large fish in shallow, clear water, set up way ahead of moving tarpon and allow them to swim toward the boat. This setup will make everything look natural without much noise from motors. The low light of daybreak helps disguise the offering and allows artificial equipment to work. Swimming plugs worked quickly in front of a school will often get a reaction strike that sends the fish airborne.