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Digest

Fewer in survey say kids key to good marriage

By TIMES WIRES
Published July 1, 2007


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NEW YORK

The percentage of Americans who consider children "very important" to a successful marriage has dropped sharply since 1990, and more now cite the sharing of household chores as pivotal, according to a new survey by the Pew Research Center on marriage and parenting. It found that children had fallen to eighth out of nine on a list of factors that people associate with successful marriages - well behind "sharing household chores, " "good housing, " "adequate income, " a "happy sexual relationship" and "faithfulness." In a 1990 World Values Survey, children ranked third in importance among the same items. The Pew survey was conducted by telephone from mid February through mid March among a random, nationwide sample of 2, 020 adults. Its margin of error is 3 percentage points.

JACKSON, MISS.

Whites win ruling on voting violation

A federal judge has ruled that a majority black county in eastern Mississippi violated whites' voting rights in what prosecutors said was the first lawsuit to use the Voting Rights Act on behalf of whites. U.S. District Judge Tom S. Lee ruled late Friday that Noxubee County Democratic Party leader Ike Brown and the county Democratic Executive Committee tried to limit whites' participation in local elections in violation of the 1965 law. Lee gave attorneys on both sides until July 29 to suggest a remedy.

RYE, N.Y.

Precaution not in place before death

A safety precaution put in place for a thrill ride after a fatal accident three years ago wasn't being followed when a woman was killed on the same ride, an amusement park official said Saturday. Gabriela Garin, 21, died Friday night after she was thrown from the Mind Scrambler at Rye Playland, about 25 miles north of Manhattan. After a 7-year-old girl was killed on the ride in 2004, officials announced plans to add seat belts, more lighting and a second attendant. No second attendant was on duty when Garin died, park spokesman Peter Tartaglia said.

FRANKFORT, KY.

Tour bus found over capacity

A tour bus that ran off the road and crashed, killing two people, was filled over capacity by 11 people and had improper registration on board, Kentucky State Police said Saturday. Neither the improper tags nor number of people onboard had anything to do with the cause of the wreck Monday on a rural stretch of Interstate 65 in southern Kentucky. Police said the bus driver apparently dozed off about 3 a.m. and ran off the road, striking an overpass. There were 66 people on the bus, including a driver and a co-driver, police said. The bus was owned by C&R Tours in Birmingham, Ala.

Elsewhere

Neola, Utah: A fast-moving wildfire in eastern Utah killed three men working in a hay field, authorities said. A 63-year-old man and his 43-year-old son died at the scene Friday. A 75-year-old man died overnight.

South Lake Tahoe, Calif.: An unattended campfire in a restricted area was the cause of a wildfire last weekend near Lake Tahoe, federal authorities said late Friday. The fire destroyed about 250 homes and 75 other structures and caused $150-million in damage.

Conway, Ark.: A small plane crashed into a house on Saturday, killing the male pilot and a woman on the ground, authorities said.

[Last modified July 1, 2007, 01:44:26]


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