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Return receipts may require software upgrade

By JOHN TORRO

© St. Petersburg Times, published April 2, 2001


Several readers wrote about last week's item on the Outlook Express Return Receipt Request item, saying they couldn't find it. I neglected to mention that this feature is dependent upon the Internet Explorer/Outlook Express version 5.01 and above (Internet Explorer SP1 for 5.0 results in version 5.01). You can update your version to either 5.01 or the latest version 5.5 at www.microsoft.com/windows/ie/.

Options for AOL mail

Q. I am trying to configure Outlook to search for all my mail (office and home). I am having difficulty finding out the incoming POP3 address and the outgoing SMTP address. Is there a way to search for this information? I can get my America Online mail on the Web, but I can't seem to configure Outlook to search for it.

A. Unfortunately, AOL does not support POP3, the Post Office Protocol. Instead, AOL uses a proprietary protocol. This makes doing a lot of things outside of the AOL world difficult, such as accessing your e-mail from a POP3-capable client such as Outlook Express, Eudora and Netscape Mail. There are add-on products you can buy that can provide this functionality, such as eNetBot Mail ($19.95, www.enetbot.com).

Keeping things on time

Q. The cost for atomtime.com, a shareware program, increased to $15, which is pricy. Are you aware of another free program that will keep PC time updated without all the other improvements?

A. Check the National Institute of Standards and Technology Web site (www.boulder.nist.gov/timefreq/service/its.htm). Click on the "Windows 95 and later" link under the Software and Instructions section. It will have several software programs (depending upon your Internet access type) that you may be able to use. I have been using the NISTIME-32BIT.EXE program for the past few years. It's a free program that works flawlessly over a dedicated Internet connection, such as a network, cable modem or DSL. People with dial-up modem access will need to use the NIST program Automated Computer Time Service, or ACTS. For users with dedicated access, create a .bat file with the following line (it assumes that you downloaded the NIST program to your Windows folder):

C:\Windows\nistime-32bit.exe /Once

Create a shortcut to this .bat file in your Startup folder and you will synchronize your PC's time on each boot.

Getting Acrobat Reader

Q. I tried to download Acrobat Reader only to discover it isn't available for Windows Me.

A: There are known problems with some versions of Adobe Acrobat older than the Windows Me release date of Sept. 14. Download the latest Acrobat Reader, version 4.05, from www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html. That will mean choosing Windows 98 as your operating system, since it's not clear when Adobe will come out with a version of Acrobat Reader for Windows Me.

Adjusting partitions

Q. I installed a new hard drive. The drive has two partitions: C and D. I have filled up the C drive and want to move some of the storage space over from the D drive back to the C drive. How do I repartition the hard drive using Windows 98?

A. There is no way to do this without running FDISK to delete and then re-create the C partition using Windows 98 utilities. Of course, this would erase all of your data. To accomplish what you want without losing data, you need to use a third-party utility such as PowerQuests Partition Magic program (www.powerquest.com/partitionmagic). For future reference, it is best to have your hard drive partitioned as one instead of multiple partitions, which requires FAT32 and at least Windows 98 SE for drives over 2 gigabytes.

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