Una Vida Mejor: A better llfe

A closer look at the images and faces in this Times series.

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Still clutching their pillows from home, hungry and tired, Ceci Tovar, left, and her sister Delia navigate their 2,600-mile odyssey from Mexico to North Carolina without speaking English. At a bus station in Dallas, they guess which Greyhound to board.
[Times photo: JOSHUA DAUTOFF]

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Palomas is so small it doesn’t appear on most maps of Mexico. Its 2,100 residents scratch out a living on the dusty plains, but the town is kept afloat by the infusion of the American dollar.
[Times photo: JOSHUA DAUTOFF]

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Six mornings a week, Mickey Daniels Jr. went out into Roanoke Sound to empty and re-bait his crab pots. Pressured by foreign competition and government regulation, the owner of Daniels Seafood found his advantage in Mexico, in a small village named Palomas.
[Times photo: PAM ROYAL ]

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Although Juana Cedillo’s U.S. income paid for the expansion of her house, the extra rooms were often vacant because the children liked sleeping together in one room, as they always had.
[Times photo: JOSHUA DAUTOFF]

Ana Rosa, 19, prays over her grandmother in the minutes before leaving Palomas in search of una vida mejor (pronounced OO-nah BEE-dah may-HOR).
[Times photo: JOSHUA DAUTOFF ]
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Juana Cedillo is rarely farther than an apron string from her small kitchen. The cost of returning to Daniels Seafood for a third year was leaving her family for six months.
[Times photo: PAM ROYAL]
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