This Midday Update comes from Congressional Quarterly,
an affiliate of the Times Publishing Company,
based in Washington, D.C.
Updates occur at approximately 2:30 p.m. weekdays
GOP HOPING TO COMPLETE BUDGET CONFERENCE REPORT QUICKLY
Republicans are hoping to schedule a new conference meeting early this week to complete a fresh copy of the fiscal 2002 budget resolution (H Con Res 83).
Source: CQ Daily Monitor, 5/7/2001, 1:54 p.m.

Highlights from the CQ Midday Update: May 7, 2001
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SENATE RESUMES EDUCATION DEBATE, TAKES UP BOLTON NOMINATION

    The Senate resumes debate today on an education overhaul measure (S 1) that includes many of President Bush's education initiatives. Senators are expected to offer new amendments to the bill starting at 2 p.m. At 4 p.m., the Senate will set aside the education bill and begin debating the nomination of John Robert Bolton to be assistant secretary of State for arms control and international security. Bolton's nomination has come under scrutiny by some Democrats who say his past opposition to arms control initiatives makes him a poor choice for the top arms control position in the State Department. But it is unlikely Democrats will block the nomination, which is scheduled for a vote tomorrow morning.

REPUBLICAN LEADERS DUMPING SENATE PARLIAMENTARIAN

    Senate Parliamentarian Bob Dove is being removed by Senate Republican leaders upset with his rulings regarding budget matters, Senate aides said today. Roll Call first reported that Dove had been fired last week as Republicans struggled to push a budget resolution through Congress. One source said Dove was fired on Thursday but rehired, on a temporary basis, on Friday. "They just want somebody who can give them straight answers," said a GOP aide. "And that's what they don't think they've been getting from Bob." Last week, both GOP and Democratic aides said, Dove irritated GOP leaders by decreeing that a Budget Act waiver would be required for a special emergency spending fund that Republicans wanted to include in the fiscal 2002 budget resolution to cover unexpected contingencies such as natural disasters. That takes 60 votes, a huge hurdle in a Senate split 50-50. Dove earlier angered GOP leaders by decreeing there could be only one tax reconciliation bill for the fiscal year.

SENATORS URGE BUSH TO PROTECT U.S. TRADE LAWS IN NEGOTIATIONS

    Max Baucus, Mont., ranking Democrat on the Senate Finance Committee, and 60 other senators sent President Bush a letter this morning urging him not to compromise U.S. anti-dumping laws in international trade agreements. "The United States should no longer use its trade laws as bargaining chips in trade negotiations, nor agree to any provisions that weaken or undermine U.S. trade laws," the letter said. It was signed by 41 Democrats and 20 Republicans, including Majority Leader Trent Lott, Miss., and Minority Leader Tom Daschle, S.D. In an accompanying statement, Baucus pointed to nations such as Japan and Brazil that have called for the weakening of U.S. anti-dumping laws, and he said the administration has "refused to recognize the critical role" of trade laws. "New trade agreements or grants of fast track that endanger key U.S. trade laws, such as antidumping law, countervailing duty law, Section 201, and Section 301, will not win congressional support," Baucus said.

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