A mother, a daughter, a murder
  

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Mad Love

The last roll of film
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A roll of undeveloped film — shot by Valessa and her friends and found in Vicki Robinson’s minivan in Texas — provided an unusual scrapbook of photos when later processed.

    


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[Times photo: Tony Lopez]
Adam Davis, left, Valessa Robinson, middle, and Jon Whispel appear in court together for a hearing in March 1999. They were seated apart in court so they could not speak to each other. For months, the three maintained their solidarity

photo Michelle Robinson, on the day before her mother’s funeral, speaks out against her sister. “How could a daughter kill a mother?” Michelle asked. “How could she do it to me? How could she do it to herself?”

[Photo: WFTS-Ch. 28]


photo Charles Robinson, in court for one of daughter Valessa’s hearings in April 1999. He had remarried and was
living in St. Louis when his ex-wife’s murder occurred.

[Times photo: Tony Lopez]


Four days after being arrested in Texas, Valessa Robinson arrives for a court appearance in Tampa on July 6, 1998.

[Times photo: Ken Helle]


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[Times photo: Jamie Francis]
Jim Englert visits Vicki Robinson’s ashes at the Sylvan Abbey Memorial Park in Clearwater on Feb. 17 of this year. It’s a visit he still makes on the 17th day of every month, marking the anniversary of his first date with Vicki, on Oct. 17, 1996 at the Clearwater jazz festival.

photo Adam Davis during his trial in November 1999: He did not testify, but his words — captured on tape by the detectives who interviewed in Texas — dominated the courtroom.

[Times photo: Tony Lopez]


At left, Valessa Robinson gives a hand sign to Adam Davis at a hearing in January 1999. The judge soon put a stop to the attempts at communication in her courtroom. Below, one of the coded letters Valessa tried to get to Adam via friends. Decoded, it read in part: “Don’t worry, be happy! I’m in love with Adam William Davis. True love always finds a way.”

[Times photo: Tony Lopez]

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Dee Ann Athan, Valessa’s attorney, quickly signaled she would fight hard for her young client. In court, Athan often referred to Valessa as “this child.”

[Times photo: Tony Lopez]


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