sptimes.com

HomeHome
Weather
Weather
LotteryLottery
ClassifiedsClassifieds
SportsSports
ComicsComics
InteractInteract
AP WireAP Wire
Web SpecialsWeb Specials

 

 

The cornerstones

Photos by ROBIN DONINA SERNE
of the Times Staff

© St. Petersburg Times, published October 25, 1998


THE FOUNDER: The finale to the L. Ron Hubbard Life Exhibition in Los Angeles is a series of pocket doors displaying 400 proclamations Hubbard received through the years. The Hollywood Boulevard museum, conceived by Miscavige, is open to the public.

PRESERVING HIS WORDS: Titanium capsules, on display in Los Angeles, are part of Scientology’s ongoing $226-million effort to archive Hubbard’s writings. His words are imprinted on stainless steel plates, stored in the capsules, then wrapped in Kevlar and placed in underground buildings to protect them from nuclear or natural disaster.

HUBBARD’S OFFICES: Every major Scientology building has an office for L. Ron Hubbard, who died in 1986. Although each is uniquely decorated to fit the building’s decor, all have fresh flowers and a red velvet rope draping the entrance.

THE E-METER: Scientologists believe the e-meter can track thoughts. This model sells for about $4,000. A parishioner holds a metal-plated “can” in each hand while an auditor asks questions about the person’s past. The meter sends a small electrical current through the body. Scientologists believe the current picks up energy from reactions, which triggers movement in the needle. The process is used in a Scientology practice called auditing, which seeks to free people of physical and emotional pain.

Back to the main story | A place called "Gold" |
David Miscavige Speaks ...

 

Business | Citrus | Commentary | Entertainment
Hernando | Floridian | Obituaries | Pasco | Sports
State | Tampa Bay
| World & Nation

Back to Top
© Copyright 1998 St. Petersburg Times. All rights reserved.